Volume 10 Supplement 1

Proceedings of the WSCTS 25th Anniversary Congress

Open Access

A Prospective study of the National Early Warning Score in Cardiothoracic Surgery

  • M Tarazi1,
  • N Chan1,
  • N Mayooran1,
  • R Neagu1,
  • B Philip1,
  • MN Anjum1 and
  • K Doddakula1
Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery201510(Suppl 1):A344

https://doi.org/10.1186/1749-8090-10-S1-A344

Published: 16 December 2015

Background/Introduction

The National Early Warning Score (NEWS) is a clinical guide used to facilitate early detection of deterioration by categorising a patient's severity of illness and prompting nursing staff to request a medical review at specific trigger points utilising a structured communication tool while following a definitive escalation plan. Adopting a National Early Warning Score (NEWS) is beneficial for standardising the assessment of acute illness severity, enabling a more timely response using a common language across acute hospitals nationally.

Aims/Objectives

To determine whether the NEWS guideline recommendations apply to post-operative cardiac and thoracic patients.

Method

A prospective study of patients undergoing cardiac and thoracic surgery was performed. Data was entered into a spread sheet using patient's medical notes and observation sheets. The data looked at procedure performed, post-operative length of stay in ICU, post-operative complications, NEWS score on arrival to ward, and average NEWS score each day up to and including day of discharge.

Results

100 post-operative cardiac patients and 100 post-operative thoracic patients were included in the study. Our results showed initially post-operative cardiac and thoracic patients had a high NEWS score that resolved during their hospital stay with no intervention or urgent medical review required.

Discussion/Conclusion

Our results show that the NEWS score guide does not correlate with cardiac and thoracic patients in the initial post-operative period. More research in this area could shed some light on potential adjustments and modifications to correlate better with our patient population.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Cork University Hospital

Copyright

© Tarazi et al. 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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