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Plasma cholinesterase activity in children with infective endocarditis

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Background

Although pre-existing heart disease in children is the most frequent predisposing factor for infective endocarditis (IE), we reporte 6 children of IE with no apparent pre-existing cardiac disease.

Methods

Our study included six patients with acquired infection from central catheter; the microbial pathogens were Streptococcus viridans (n=3) and Staphyloccocus aureus (n=3). The diagnosis of IE was based on positive blood culture (2 positive cultures of blood samples drawn > 12 hours), evidence of endocardial involvement (positive ECHO), measuring raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate and plasma cholinesterase (PChE) activity. We measured PChE activity (µmol min-1ml-1) in children with IE (group A, n=6) and in IE-free children (group B, n=10). For determination of PChE activity vein blood samples were collected and stored at -20°C until analyzed. PChE activity was determined by the spectrophotometric method of Ellman using butyryltiocholine as the substract (Sigma Chemical Co., St.Luis, Mo, USA). Statistical analysis was made by Student’s t-test.

Results

In group A of examined children with IE we measured decreased PChE activity (1.89 ± 0,24) relation to patients of control group B (3,97 ± 0,20).

Conclusion

Our study indicates that PChE activity can be also an important parameter for the diagnosis of IE.

Author information

Correspondence to LJ Popovic.

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This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Keywords

  • Endocarditis
  • Cholinesterase
  • Infective Endocarditis
  • Positive Culture
  • Positive Blood Culture